ALLEGRA – Grey Flûte Champagne

275,00

The Allegra champagne flûte is the perfect balance between sophisticated and fun glass.

Availability: in stock
Shipment: in 24 Hrs
Dimensions: Cm 12 x 10 / 3,93″ x 4,72″ / 500 ml
Materials: Murano Glass
Weight 220-300 g
SKU: BCF1-001-009-1 Category: Tags: , , ,

Description

“I dedicated the Allegra flute to my niece. It is a sophisticated object capable of uniting Venice’s blown glass tradition with the passion I have for hard stones”.

The Allegra flute has an hexagonal shape, typical of the very lightly-blown Murano glass, but it has been re-adapted by using grey-glass and by making it larger. Additionally, it is evenly tapered towards the lower end until it is joint – with hot sealing technique – to the round base. The glass is enriched by a small hematite button which is shined until it becomes platinum-looking. Allegra requires a long time to be crafted, as well as a wide array of know-how knowledge, but this process creates objects that are truly unique and only have very subtle differences.

The chalice’s slightly ashy color doesn’t lose the transparency necessary to appreciate the perlage of the champagne, which will lightly warm the grey tones in an interesting nuance game.

The Designer

The life of Giberto Arrivabene Valenti Gonzaga is viscerally linked to Venice. His childhood memories, the most beautiful, are those that have taken place in the rooms of Palazzo Papadopoli, between frescoes of Tiepolo and family affection. “In my earliest memories Venice had other colours. It was more obscure, dramatic, decayed and deeply romantic – simply beautiful. There wasn’t the same light like there is today – more dazzling perhaps, but less poetic.”

Craftmanship

Each piece derives from a watercolour sketch made by Giberto on tracing paper: “When I see something that inspires me, or an object that I like, I sketch and rework it – then move on to the realization of it.”

The glass, the main material in the collections, is worked exclusively in Murano. Each glass, each specific object, is blown by master glassmakers in the Venetian furnaces.

Giberto takes his watercolours to discuss with them and refine the project, check its feasibility, and to make eventual changes.